Author: thepubliclense

From high school teaching to Tourism field

I realised that “life is a matter of choice and every choice you make in life, makes you”. As a fine art teacher, nature was always the best source of inspiration for different forms of art like landscape for painting.

Birds, animals and plants for mosaics and printing . In the same case most materials and tools used in making articles are got from nature. All this kept my love for nature growing every time. Until I went my long time friend who was already a senior birder,Crammy Wanyama the director Avian safaris. Crammy with his policy of “Acandle looses nothing lighting another”, Transformed my life, through proving me with all the required guidance, tools and trainings for over two years. I always define Crammy as atrue mentor and a best friend ever. although I continued teaching, all free space including weekends were utilized for birding excursions, visiting different game parks for mammals and other wild life with my associate Akankwasa Frank, upto when i took my first trip with Nature trails east africa (http://www.eastafricantrails.com ), Although teaching has facilitated my dream of becoming a national general tour guide/ driver guide. It’s now high time to put the chalk aside and a Vail my self for more trips since it’s hard to make progress without making decision. For birding, wild life, primate tracking and city tour, you can get me through Avian safaris ( https://aviansafaris.com )or on my email; nzetonny2015@yahoo.com.

After finding out that Uganda is a birding paradise, this took losts my attention and defined my area of research.. I realised that Uganda is arguably the most attractive country in Africa to bird watchers, not only because of the unusually high number of species recorded within its borders, but also because it offers easy access to several bird-rich habitats that are difficult to reach elsewhere. Uganda’s remarkable avian diversity 1078 species with a recent sighting of Dickinson’s Kestrel making the list of 1079 species recorded. indicative of uganda’s transitional location is the fact that only one bird is endemic to the country, the somewhat Fox’s Weaver. Although if you are to consider only East Africa then 150 birds species are found only in Uganda. This list includes seven out of 21 Hornbill species recorded in the region, five out of 14 Honeyguides, 8 Sunbirds, 7 out of 21 Woodpeckers, 11 out of 36 Bulbuls and Greenbuls, 5 out of 20 Bush shrikes, 13 thrush family, 11 Warbers 10 flycatchers 8 weavers, 13 finches, 4 Tinkerbirds, 4 pigeons r Doves and 3 Kingfishers, 3 sparrowhaks, 3 Cuckoos and 3 Nightjars. The rainforests of western Uganda must be seen as the country’s most birding habitat residing the albertain endemic species, one that is of greatest to bird watchers, However if you want to see a wide range of Uganda birds, you can be taken around Entebbe( water and forest birds), Lake Mburo( water and acacia-associated birds), Queen Elizabeth (a wide variety of habitats; over 600 species recorded), Murchison Falls (a wide variety of habitats) Mabamba bay (the best place in East Africa to see the papyrus-associated Shoebill) and kidepo (nothern semi-desert specials; over 50 raptors recorded).
Uganda’s appeal as birding destination has been enhanced in recent years by improving avian knowledge and General guiding practices, on that part I appreciate the tireless efforts of Mr Byaruhanga Herbet for his trainings and fruitful excursions that he always organize through Uganda Safari Guides Association (USAGA), he has produced most of the best Uganda’s bird guides and am so proud being part of them.

Uganda Airlines hits the sky in December

By December this year, government will have procured four aircraft as efforts to revive the defunct Uganda Airlines take shape. According to Works and Transport minister Eng Monica Ntege Azuba, the four aircraft of Bombardier will have 80-100 passenger chauffeur capacity. The aircraft will arrive and start flying by December, she said.


By George Mangula

A 100-seater Bombardier regional aircraft
“We’re starting with four aircrafts and these are Bombardier aircraft. The sitting capacity is 80 to 100 passengers. They are produced by Bombardier which is from Canada. We had a team and it has done studies and a business plan was made – it was found that it would be viable. What I have to tell you is that when you’re in the airline business, you don’t plan on making profits as soon as you you start. So according to the business plan we’ll break even after 4-5 years.” said Azuba.

According to Azuba, government will later purchase two Airbus A330 series 800 wide – twin engine propeller aircraft. These will have a 300 sitting capacity each. She said government has already paid a commitment fee of $1.2 million to the Canada-based Bombardier manufacturer and France-based Airbus manufacturer.

Addressing journalists on the NRM manifesto implementation at Uganda National Roads Authority offices in Kyambogo – Kampala, Azuba said government has done a feasibility study and business plan indicating that revamping Uganda Airlines, which was grounded in 2002, will be a viable venture.

However, Azuba said government is cognisant of the fact that they won’t make profits in the airline business from the first day. She said government will be innovative after venturing into the airline business by looking beyond passengers and cargo transport.
“When you’re starting an airline, you don’t get funds from passengers only. You have to be innovative, you have ground handling, you have catering services, you have maintenance and all those that fall under the airline. There are other subsidiaries that you have to create and that will come in and these are the ones that support the airline to make sure that it remains in operational and profitable.” she added.

She added that the airline will be fully owned by government but will later sell shares to release the pressure from the national coffers.

“These four airlines will be in operation from November-December and the details as to where they’re going to fly, I don’t have the details off hand [but] definitely within the region and that includes Kenya and all other countries we have bilateral agreements with.” said Azuba.

Revamping Uganda Airlines was atop of President Yoweri Museveni’s must do list after 2016 presidential elections. Inaugurating a cabinet in October 2016, Museveni directed the line ministry to commence work on the task.

“The ministry of Works and Transport is directed to conclude discussions with the investors that can help us to start a national airline.

Museveni argued that “a national airline would help us save $420 million per year that Ugandans spend on travel. The national airline will also create jobs and career opportunities for our children who train as pilots at Soroti Flying School.”

I have walked a long journey which has been perfected over time

Speaker Rebecca AlitwalaKadaga is the first female speaker of parliament of Uganda. She punched her way to politics on the affirmative card when she contested forMember of Parliament representing the women of Kamuliin 1989 (NRC) to date. She has been at the forefront of championing gender equality andwomen empowerment. The Public Lens’ Stephen Bwire caught up with her in a no-holds-barred interview. Excerpts;-

You have been in the corridors of power for quite long, serving in the various portfolios. How would you describe your experience of being in government?
Well, first the arrival of women has been gradual. If you look at the structure of government over many years, we had no women ministers. Among the first female ministers we had Hon. Bagaya and Mrs.Senkatuka then after that followed by Mrs.Bitamazire, and then the numbers kept growing. But we have to lead in order to open doors because the structure of our society did not acknowledge the leadership of women; so patriarchy still exists, and one has to navigate that journey through patriarchy to be able to do work.Secondly, you have to be exceedingly good so that no questions are asked about your capacity. So, it has been an interesting journey.

How have you broken-through the barriers to scale to the top in a male-dominated world, considering the positions you have held locally and internationally?
First, it requires a lot of preparation and it didn’t just happen, I have been consistently attending the meetings, but also I have taken many leadership positions both in the Commonwealth and the IPU [Inter-Parliamentary Union]. In the Commonwealth, I started as a branch representative, then I became the chair of the CWP [Commonwealth Parliamentarians] Africa, so I worked on programs that no other Chair had done, and no other region in the Commonwealth had done except Africa. So my work was outstanding. Because of the work I had done in Africa, they thought I should also support them to do the international work and build the women parliamentarians which I did quite well. within the IPUI started as a member and then I became a chair of a standing committee, later I became a member of the executive committee, where I represented the East African region; and forinstance when I was in the regional executive, we brought in south Sudan, we brought in Somalia, we brought in new members to the IPU through my leadership in the executive committee. So it has been a journey, but it has been perfected overtime.

As a champion of women empowerment, what are some of the initiatives you have undertaken as Speaker of Parliament to improve the lives of women?
Within Parliament, we have advocated to have daycare facility for the children so that mothers who come there are comfortable. And this applies to all public places, for instance now all the new markets must have a daycare facility so that women in the market can have their children playing while they are doing their work. We have also advocated for other facilities for instance we have proposed that all new roads which are being built should have positions for resting so that if you have been travelling with a small child in a bus, you don’t have to go and take the child to the bush to urinate. We have proposed that all the roads should have those rest areas where there’s a bathroom, there’s a small restaurant, where people can sit, or change the children or something like that, so those are some of the things on infrastructure. Of course we have discussed the buildings for some of the women who are disabled and so on, so we have discussed all those. We have been advocating hard for the people with disabilities, and we recently wrote to the President that the people in the judiciary should be trainedin sign language so that they are able to communicate with the people with disabilities.Those are some of the areas we are working on;but on education, we have worked on reduction of taxes on many items that the women use for instance the sanitary towels we removed the taxes that had been re-introduced. At a different level, personally I have worked on the issue of water, in my constituency there’s a lot more water than many other places because the women spend so much time and the children spend so much time walking to look for the water, if there’s a water point, you have thousands of Jerrycans who could stay there day and night, so one of the things we need to do to help the rural woman is to make sure she has water so that she can collect quickly and do her work. There used to be a program on cooking stoves which would enable the people to cook very quickly, I don’t know how far it has spread- it used to be in the ministry of energy, but I don’t hear much about it though this is one of the interventions that would help the rural woman to be able to cook quickly and get time to do other things and maybe to even go and do business. So, also to take their medical services nearer, we still have a challenge on schools. The distances that the children have to walk, sometimes they really have to walk very many miles, so it’s risky for them because they have to start walking early in the morning, they have got to come back late in the night, so all those risks we need to address so that facilities are put nearer where the children can access them quickly maybe 1km or something so that they don’t have to walk long distances. And then of course we have been discussing and trying to improve on the household income, we are trying really hard to ensure that there are more economic activities which women can do in order to earn a living.

Day by day, you have been seen to push for the independence of the Legislature in accordance with the doctrine of separation of powers. Are you satisfied that the institution which you superintend is somewhat independent?
I think we have made progress, you know before the1995 constitution, the powers heavily gravitated towards the Executive, the Legislature and Judiciary were like small brothers of the Executive, but the Constitution has given us some autonomy,but I have learnt that it’s a constant battle to remind the other branches that don’t step on my feet. This is my parameter, and this is your parameter, don’t step on my feet. So we have made progress because I have been continuously talking about it, and we are gaining ground.

We witnessed a huge storm in parliament during the debate to amend the Constitution to lift presidential age limits. How did you manage to steer through this chaotic process and restore the House to normalcy?
One of the things I did was to give people time to talk, so that those who were in favour of the amendment spoke, but also those who were not in favour had an opportunity to speak, and for me I wanted to give them an opportunity to convince their colleagues. If they believe you, they will vote with you. For me the important thing was to be able to table the positions of all the sides and then reach and take a vote. You know if I have ten votes and you have one it means I have got more people on my side than you. So for me it was really allowing them to speak and it was one of the longest sittings we had because I think we were sitting up to eleven almost every day .We were sitting the whole day. More than 150 members spoke, so in the end all those who had the issues that they wanted to air were able to speak and finally when the vote came, they were able to vote. But it requires some skills to manage the sitting.

As a senior national NRM party leader, what do you have to say about the current squabbles in the party where some of our leaders are pulling ropes?
I think the main problem is that we don’t meet as a party. We don’t meet. For instance the Central Executive Committee has not sat for several months. If we were meeting, we would probably listen to what is happening in our departments. So for me the failure to meet is a big hindrance to the work of the party. Actually I can’t tell you that I know what is happening. I don’t know why the people were dismissed [party secretariat staff were summarily sacked], so the absence of meeting is a big problem.

The question of gender parity has lingered on for long. In your tenure in parliament, what have you done to answer this question of gender parity especially in leadership positions?
Other than the constitutional provisions, during my tenure, we were able to amend the rules of procedure to ensure that 40% of the leadership positions in the House are held by women. It was a long struggle, it took us about four years but eventually it was achieved. Now we have 42% and I hope it can grow to equality. The idea is to go 50:50.

Are there women leaders you would look at and feel proud of their achievements?

Within parliament, there have been some, but also out there, there are women who continue to inspire;people like Grace Mpanga, Rhoda Kalema, Victoria Sekitoleko, Dr. Kazibwe, they have been many. Especially the ones with whom we joined in 1989, People like Roy Nkwasibwe. And then of course now we have more people like Doris Akol of URA, AllenKagina at UNRA, Jennifer Musisiat the KCCA, in the UIA there is JollyKamuhangire. We also have a number of accounting officers who are ladies.

What would think of as most memorable event during the time you have been in public service?
I think the real memorable one would be, that in 2012 we were able to host for the first time and probably the only time in the next 50 years the Inter Parliamentary Union, it was part of our golden jubilee celebrations. The last international meeting of parliament was in 1967 during Obote 1. It was the Commonwealth. After that there has been no international meetings of parliament so IPU was really the big one, with the golden jubilee but also an opportunity to market Uganda and even now some of the people who came, now come back for holidays, many of the delegates come back here for holidays so I thing that’s the big one. Maybe I can tell you that in 2019, we are going to now host the international Common wealth since 1967.

Why I dropped chalk for life in the wild

As a fine art teacher, nature has always been the best source of inspiration for different forms of art like landscape for painting. Birds, animals and plants for mosaics and printing.
In the same case, most materials and tools used in making articles are got from nature. All this kept my love for nature growing every time.

The cord that connected my passion for nature with the wildlife is my longtime friend who was already a senior birder, Crammy Wanyama, the director Avian Safaris. Wanyama brought out the wild in me by proving me with all the required guidance, tools and trainings for over two years. I would always describe him as a true mentor and a best friend ever. Although I continued teaching, I would utilise each available time and space including weekends for birding excursions, visiting different game parks for mammals and other wild life with my associate Akankwasa Frank, up to when I would take my first trip with Nature Trails East Africa (http://www.eastafricantrails.com ).
Unique bird species

Birding has defined my life. I realised that Uganda is arguably the most attractive country in Africa to bird watchers, not only because of the unusually high number of species recorded within its borders, but also because it offers easy access to several bird-rich habitats that are difficult to reach elsewhere. Uganda has got the most remarkable avian diversity (1,078 species) with a recent sighting of Dickinson’s Kestrel making the list of 1,079 species recorded. One striking aspect about Uganda’s transitional location is the fact that only one bird is endemic to the country, the Fox’s Weaver. If you are to consider only East Africa then 150 bird species are found only in Uganda. This list includes 7 out of 21 Hornbill species recorded in the region, 5 out of 14 Honeyguides, 8 Sunbirds, 7 out of 21 Woodpeckers, 11 out of 36 Bulbuls and Greenbuls, 5 out of 20 Bush shrikes, 13 thrush family, 11 Warbers, 10 flycatchers, 8 weavers, 13 finches, 4 Tinkerbirds, 4 pigeons or Doves and 3 Kingfishers, 3 sparrowhaks, 3 Cuckoos and 3 Nightjars.
The rainforests of Western Uganda must be seen as the country’s most birding habitat owing to its altitude. The Albertine Graben hosts some endemic species, and this particular area is of great interest to bird watchers. All the 24 of the Albertine rift endemic species recorded in Uganda occur in Bwindi National park including the highly sought African green broadbill, Dwarf honeyguide, Purpe-breasted sunbird, Blue-headed Sunbird Red-faced woodland warbler to mention but a few. Others present elsewhere can be found in Mgahinga forest, Echuya forest, Mountain Rwenzori and Kibale forest all in the western region.

However, if you want to see a wide range of Uganda birds, you can be taken around Entebbe (water and forest birds), Lake Mburo (water and acacia-associated birds), Queen Elizabeth (a wide variety of habitats; over 600 species recorded), Murchison Falls (a wide variety of habitats) Mabamba bay (the best place in East Africa to see the papyrus-associated Shoebill) and Kidepo (nothern semi-desert specials; over 50 raptors recorded).
Uganda’s appeal as a birding destination has been enhanced in recent years by improving avian knowledge and general guiding practices. On that part I appreciate the tireless efforts of Mr Byaruhanga Herbert for his trainings and fruitful excursions that he always organizes through Uganda Safari Guides Association (USAGA), he has produced most of Uganda’s bird guides, and I am proud being part of them.
Although teaching has facilitated my dream of becoming a national general tour guide/ driver guide, it’s now high time to put the chalk aside and avail myself for more trips to the wild.
For birding, wild life, primate tracking and city tour, you can get me through Avian Safaris (https://aviansafaris.com)or on my email; nzetonny2015@gmail.com.

President Museveni addresses the Nation on the State of Security

While ddressing a special sitting of Parliament this afternoon on the question of security, the President announced 10 measures the government will undertake to check insecurity in the country.

1. All legally held guns will be finger-printed. When this happens, once a cartridge is fired, we shall be able to tell which gun discharged the bullet. If any legally-held gun is used in crime, we shall trace it, this includes guns in private hands but licensed by the police.

2. Every vehicle and motorcycle will be required to have electronic number plates with an electronic signal, installed at cost of the owner. However, we shall protect people’s privacy.

Our concern will only be with vehicles or pikipikis seen in an area where crime is committed. If one attempts to interfere with the number plate, the central monitoring unit will be notified.

3. Hoods for motorcycle riders is banned. Police will charge anybody covering themselves that way. Riders will also have to wear helmets with illuminated numbers both at the front and back.

These helmets will be registered and details captured in the central monitoring hub. I encourage the National Enterprises Corporation and our private sector here to manufacture these helmets here. We should not spend money importing them.

4. Installation of cameras on town roads and streets and along highways. Potentially the criminal or enemy can evade other forms of detection except the optical; eye, camera and telescope.

If necessary, the cameras will have thermal sensors. If criminals try childish games of covering their heads, they will be seen at the command post.

5. Modern foresinc laboratory. I thought the national ID project should have done this. We shall capture thumb prints and DNA of criminals so that we can trace once blood is left at the crime scene.

Even other elements like sweat, saliva, hair will also be analysed. If you want our country to be peaceful, why fear to offer DNA for storage. Support me so that we stabilize our country.

6. Speed of response and how quickly we arrive at the scene. I have directed the police to revive the 999 and reform the Flying Squad. It should be a real flying squad. We are providing UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles or drones) and light helicopters.

7. The enemy can also use drones to promote crime. The defence committee has authorised 30 UAVs. We have 130 applications while 500 have been impounded. They were being smuggled into the country. The responsible minister will bring a law to regulate use of these drones.

8. Misuse of social media. Criminals use social media to threaten violence and create panic. We are going to acquire capacity to quickly locate criminals abusing social media. The government does not want to block these sites but we shall pick out the jiggers. We won’t cut the entire foot.

9. Acquire more scanners under the Uganda Revenue Authority to check all containers coming into and exiting the country. Criminals hiding guns as cargo will be grabbed. The Era of weak or non-existent state authority ended.

10. Back to the army. Our strategy is a small, professional, well-equipped army, backed with a large reserve force. Our military capacity is robust created over last 50 years. We have capacity to defend Uganda.

EAC has been urged to prepare adequately in the wake of major disease outbreaks

The East African Community (EAC) has been urged to prepare adequately in the wake of major disease outbreaks.

Saturday, 2 June 2018

Arusha. The East African Community (EAC) has been urged to prepare adequately in the wake of major disease outbreaks.

The regional pandemic preparedness should be modelled on One Health approach, a multi-disciplinary collaborative way of addressing the global health challenges.

The advice was made in Nairobi early this week by Dr. Irene Lukassowitz, the GIZ-EAC manager for pandemic preparedness (PanPrep) during a
Stakeholders’ meeting on health crisis communication.

The German medical expert coordinates the GIZ-supported project which aims at strengthening the EAC secretariat in its regional pandemic preparedness.

Although saved from major disease outbreaks that hit various parts of Africa in recent years, EAC has lately taken stringent measures to stop the spread of the deadly Ebola into the region.

Dr Lukassowitz emphasized One Health initiative approach in tackling the major epidemics was best suited to the region given its multi-disciplinary nature.

The Nairobi meeting for Risk and Crisis Communications (RCC) on both communicable and non-communicable diseases was organized by the EAC secretariat and GIZ, the German development aid agency.

It is aimed to broaden awareness of health experts involved in risk and crisis communication in the EAC region and introduce the concept through One Health model.

“We want to enable the participants to communicate better whenever there are outbreaks that affect both human beings and animals”, said Dr. Stanley Sonoiya, the EAC principal health officer according to a dispatch to Media houses

He said although the medical experts have technical skills to tackle the diseases, there was a missing gap in terms of communication between them and the public at large.

Plot to blackmail Kadaga over MPs’ salary exposed


Plot to blackmail Kadaga over MPs’ salary exposed, Leaked document is Nasser Road job, says Obore.
Some people are fighting the speaker [Rebecca Kadaga], they want to make her look so bad before the eyes of the public, and they are also fighting us the legislators – Peter Ogwang

The parliamentary commission has exposed a plot intended to malign the speaker of parliament and the entire institution of parliament over the alleged pay raise to legislators, The Public Lens can reveal.
Usuk County MP, Peter Ogwang, who is a member of the parliamentary commission, speaking to this newspaper, laid bare the attempt by some individuals working behind the scenes to bring into disrepute the person of the speaker and members of parliament as a “bunch of greedy fellows whose preoccupation is making money.”
“Some people are fighting the speaker [Rebecca Kadaga], they want to make her look so bad before the eyes of the public, and they are also fighting us the legislators. So, they had to sit down and concoct a report that we are working to raise our salaries. This is not true,” said Ogwang, adding that “MPs are aware of the national pressing needs, and thus have no plans to increase their salaries.”

On Thursday last week, speaker Rebecca Kadaga rubbished reports of MPs’ salary increment plan when the acrimonious issue was raised by Dokolo North MP Paul Amoru, who said that he been inundated with inquiries from his constituents demanding an explanation about the alleged salary increment.
In her response, the speaker unequivocally said that the parliamentary commission had no plans whatsoever to increase the MPs’ salaries.

“The budget process started in March; everything we have is clear and known,” said Kadaga.
“I am the chairperson of the Parliamentary Commission. The budget process started in March. Everything has been clear. There has been no attempt to increase the salaries of MPs. I want to invite the public to just ignore the story. It is not true,” she said.

In his detailed response to this allegation, parliament’s director of communications Chris Obore dismissed the said leaked report as a “Nasser Road job.” “Respect for the reader is demonstrated by giving them what is verifiable, not what hypnotises them,” he said. “What the reporters touted as a leaked budget paper was a half-page print-out possibly of someone’s concoction on their computer or simply a Nasser Road (a street in Kampala known for printing fake official documents) job,” elaborates Obore, adding: “A budget framework paper is a public document and that is why it has to be presented before parliament for budget legitimisation. Surely, a hardworking and committed journalist should be capable of getting the document!”

Downgrading the report which was first published by one of the dailies, Obore said that “the story simply fed the wrong perception that MPs earn too much and that Parliament has loads of money; never mind that the budget of Parliament has, for years, never exceeded Shs 500n (1.2 per cent of the national Budget).”
The parliamentary publicist agrees with MP Ogwang that there is a cabal working day and night to malign the speaker and the institution of parliament. “Their [blackmailers] machinations won’t prevail. They have been fighting Kadaga both as speaker and as an individual from the time she was elected speaker of the House. They are simply trying to dig at her,” he contended.

Govt position on salary
When the “cooked report” was released to the public domain, Secretary to Treasury Keith Muhakanizi, who denied ever seeing the said document, warned that a salary increment for MPs will be a disaster for Uganda’s economy, further appealing to legislators to have low-ranking civil servants get pay rise instead.
Responding to the report which had suggested that MPs were planning to increase their salaries from the current basic pay of Shs 11m to Shs 24m each in the 2018-19 financial year, Muhakanzi said that the increment “will be a disaster because the budget is already over-stretched” and Uganda was currently having “strong negotiations” with IMF over budget support.

Muhakanizi, also the finance ministry’s permanent secretary, noted that even the current salary bill of the 451 MPs was already leading to over borrowing.
“We should not add on [the number of MPs and salaries]” said Muhakanizi. “Instead we should be cutting.”
The permanent secretary added that “time had come to be responsible and allow lower cadres in civil service and the army and police to have the first call on salary increase”.

On top of monthly salary of Shs11m, every MP gets subsistence allowance of Shs4.5m, town running allowance (Shs1m), gratuity (Shs1m), medical allowance (Shs500,000), committee sitting allowance (Shs50,000), plenary sitting allowance (150,000), as well as mileage allowance from Parliament to the furthest point of an individual MP’s constituency.

By Stephen Bwire

Museveni warns Leaders against shoddy road works

President Yoweri Museveni has threatened to take disciplinary actions against Chief Administrative Officers (CAOs) who fail to monitor constructions of government projects in their respective districts.

The President who also doubles as the NRM National Party Chairman has pointed out that many upcountry roads were being done poorly due to duty negligence by the CAOs whom he said were the accounting officers in the districts.

Speaking at a mamoth campaign rally at Rukungiri Municipal stadium this Tuesday evening, Museveni said some of the roads dont even have offshoots to facilitate proper water drainage.

The visibly concerned NRM Party Chairman further mentioned that some of the said poorly constructed roads were worked on by UNRA, an authority responsible for roads condtruction and maintenance in the country.

He was however quick to blame the shoddy works more on district leaders where such projects are situated. He also said he would talk to UNRA’s Hellen Kagima over the same.

The President further blamed the same district leaders for the missing drugs in government health units. “Drugs missing out in health units is partly a weakness of these CAOs, DISOs and RDCs who sit in offices without monitoring and submitting reports to relevant authorities”, the President observed.

VOTE WINFRED MASIKO

This was the President’s 5th rally of the day and the 9th since Monday.

In his conclusion remarks, Museveni made a final appeal to the people of Rukungiri to vote NRM’s Winifred Masiko on Thursday.

He said sending Masiko back to Parliament would mean more development to the district since she won’t engage herself in resisting government projects as opposition MPs do but lobby more services for her electorates.

Rogers MULINDWA
Communications Officer – NRM

North, South Korean presidents meet again at border

North, South Korean presidents meet again at border, Trump expresses willingness to reinstate talks with Kim Jung Un 26 May, 2018

The leaders of North and South Korea have met again at a border village to discuss a now cancelled US-North Korean summit, the Associated Press reported.

US President Donald Trump announced the cancellation of a landmark summit between North Korea and the US on Thursday, citing “tremendous anger and open hostility” by the North.

North Korea’s Kim Jong-un and South Korean Moon Jae-in met in April in what was only the third meeting between the leaders of the two states.

“There is no reason why we should fight each other – we are one nation,” Kim said in a joint statement with Moon after that meeting.

Pyongyang and Seoul also pledged to formally end the state of war between the two, which has been ongoing since a 1953 ceasefire agreement that brought to a halt large scale hostilities between them.

The office of the South Korean president said the outcome of Saturday’s meeting will be announced on Sunday.

The meeting on Saturday is the latest chapter in a long-running diplomatic effort to end North Korea’s nuclear weapons programme.

Concerns grew earlier this month after North Korea responded to the US calling for the denuclearisation of the peninsula and a complete dismantling of the nuclear programme by threatening to pull out of the summit unless Washington offered something in return.

Following Trump’s cancellation of the summit, North Korea issued a statement declaring it was still open to talks.

“It was a very nice statement they put out,” Trump said at the White House.

“We’re talking to them now. They very much want to do it. We’d like to do it,” he added. “We’ll see what happens – it [the summit] could even be the 12th [of June].”

President tours Buremba and Kazo counties – speaks out on environmental degradation


Yesterday in Kazo County of Kiruhura District, I laid a foundation stone for construction of St Andrew’s Church, Buremba and broke ground for construction of science laboratories at St Catherine’s Girls SS.

I also unveiled the foundation stone for St John’s Church of Uganda office block and launched 600 Saccos before addressing a rally at Kazo Town Council.

St Andrew’s Church, Buremba is important for me because it is where I prayed in 1981 shortly before I left for the Bush to start an armed resistance against the Obote government.

I went to see Mzee Christopher Rubarenzya, an elder, as a way of bidding him farewell even if I did not tell him the purpose of my visit. Later, he brought me to this church and we prayed.

Later, I again came to check on him and we still prayed at this church. I however realised that the sanctuary was still in the same state that I had left it. I resolved to join the Christians to rehabilitate it. I am happy that we now have a renovated church.

I am also happy to notice that Buremba, which for a long time was underdeveloped, is now a developed area with electricity and a good road network.

I thank the elders in this area like Mzee Rubarenzya for pioneering in many things and setting a good example and foundation for other residents. I also thank the Christians for using the church to spread gospel of development.

On my way to Buremba, I noticed that some people are establishing gardens and planting trees in swamps. I want all of them to vacate, and the Chief Administrative Officer should enforce this. When you drain swamps you interfere with the rain formation cycle which leads to drought.

At the launch of the Saccos and the subsequent rally at Kazo Town Council, I commended the wanainchi for taking the initiative to develop themselves through co-operative movements.

Government has a lot of interventions for organised groups and Saccos should be able to benefit. For example, the women and youth funds plus micro finance support to saccos.

Members of Parliament should help you with information concerning these and the district leadership should ensure that money allocated for such ventures reaches the intended groups.

Touring the exhibition, I noticed some people have taken to apiary, honey making and fruit farming. This shows that the people here have woken up. Working with the MP, we shall support these initiatives.